Livingston Stone and the McCloud River Hatcheries

A view of the McCloud as it probably appeared when Stone and his crew first arrived.  National Archives 22-FFB-518 The crew of the U.S. Fish Commission builds a bridge across the McCloud with the help of a Wintu Indian (right).  Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone. Stone and his crew seem to have enjoyed setting up scenes like this for the photographer. My guess is that they had built a more substantial headquarters building alongside the McCloud by the time this picture was made, but wanted to show the people back home what the early days had been like. To my eye it looks like Myron Greene on the left, Willard Perrin in the middle, and perhaps Stone on the right.  Photo courtesy of Beck McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone. A portrait of some Wintu Indians on the McCloud River in 1882.  National Archives FFB-486 Livingston Stone and his assistants had this portrait taken in San Francisco in 1873. Willard Perrin was Stone's nephew. There is some confusion about the identity of the man on the right. Although the front of the photo says it is Loren Greene, the back suggests it may have actually been Loren's brother Myron. The latter seems more likely as other records from the time state that it was Myron who went on the 1873 expedition.  Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, Stone's granddaughter. An Attack. The men on the left appear to be Wintu Indians, and the men on the right to be from the U.S. Fish Commission. The subjects would have had to have stood very still for a long time to have produced such a clear picture; the photograph was clearly staged for the benefit of the photographer. However, similar confrontations were a very real phenomenon, especially in the early years of the U.S. Fish Commission's presence on the McCloud. Stone and his crew were threatened several times and other would-b This drawing of a dam and water wheel was likely sketched by Stone or one of the other U.S. Fish Commission crewmembers on the McCloud. It looks like it might represent the dam and wheel in this photo.  Courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone. A picture of some Wintu Indians, the original inhabitants of the McCloud River area. Date unknown.  Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone Horsemen cross the McCloud River near the salmon station, probably around 1882.  National Archives 22-FFB-328 A group of Wintu taken about 1882.  National Archives 22-FFB-527 A portrait of a Wintu Indian Livingston Stone stands at the back of this small boat, guiding a fishing expedition for rainbow trout. The back of the photo reads "Trout expedition by Livingston Stone + Willard [or M~] Perrin." The photo was probably taken some time on the McCloud some time between 1879 and 1888. It is hard to say what method they were using to catch the fish--nets, rods, and traps were all employed by Stone and his crew.  Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone. Boxing was as good a way to pass the time as any on the McCloud. Nothing was written on the back of this photo. It appears to have been taken at the main U.S. Fish Commission. Livingston Stone is visible sitting down in the background and the boxer on the left appears to be Loren Greene, one of Stone's first assistants.The photo is courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone. Two men sitting on a rock by the McCloud River This portrait of Livingston Stone was taken some time after 1873 in San Francisco.  Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone This portrait of Livingston Stone appears to have been taken before he grew his dundrearies and travelled to California.  Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone A portrait of the U.S. Fish Commission crew on the McCloud. Livingston Stone is in the back, second from left. Date and photographer unknown.  Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone The trout breeding station on the McCloud There are no notes on this picture to indicate it's date or location. The dam and water wheel were probably built on the McCloud by the U.S. Fish Commission to catch fish or supply water to the hatchery and rearing ponds.  Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, Livingston Stone's granddaughter. This portrait of Livingston Stone, his wife Rebecca, and son Ned was taken by Thomas Houseworth, a famous San Francisco photographer. Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone The site on the McCloud where Stone and his crew spawned salmon and trout for so many years is now hundreds of feet beneath Lake Shasta, at approximately the site where this photo was taken.  Photo by Anders Halverson

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