The Green River "Rehabilitation" of 1962

Flaming Gorge before the gates on the dam were closed.  Photo by Rex Gary Schmidt. Courtesy of National Conservation Training Center. #4485 The Flaming Gorge Dam as it appeared in August, 1962.  Photo by Rex Gary Schmidt. Courtesy of National Conservation Training Center. #4440 Agency personnel set up a rotenone drip station on the Green River 25 miles north of the Utah State Line  Photo by Rex Gary Schmidt. Courtesy of National Conservation Training Center. #4435 Photo by Rex Gary Schmidt. Courtesy of National Conservation Training Center. #4489 Green River near Big Piney.  Courtesy of Jerry Smith, University of Michigan Museum of Zoology. Setting up a rotenone drip station in the mouth of flaming gorge in 1962.  Photo by Rex Gary Schmidt. Courtesy of National Conservation Training Center, FWS 4490 Rotenone drip lines like this were set up every ten miles along the Green River.  Photo by Rex Gary Schmidt. Courtesy of National Conservation Training Center. #4437 The Bridge in Browns Park where the detoxification took place.  W.H. Kittams, National Park Service Agency personnel set up the detoxification station on the bridge in Browns Park, Colorado. Spreaders like the one in the middle of the picture were used to put potassium permanganate into the Green River.  Photo by Rex Gary Schmidt. Courtesy of National Conservation Training Center. #4434 A biologist examines a sentinel cage in the Green River. Carp were placed in cages like these. They were one of the best means available to determine the toxicity of the water from rotenone during the Green River Rehabilitation.  Photo by Rex Gary Schmidt. Courtesy of National Conservation Training Center. #4438 Putting an airboat into the Green River to inspect the ongoing rotenone operation.  Photo by Rex Gary Schmidt. Courtesy of National Conservation Training Center. #4436 Courtesy of Jerry Smith, University of Michigan Museum of Zoology A drip station on the Green River.  W.H. Kittams (National Park Service) The rotenone in the Green River turned the water white. Courtesy of Jerry Smith, University of Michigan Museum of Zoology Robert R. Miller, Jerry Smith, Jane Davis, and Jack Davis hold up Colorado Pikeminnow killed during the Green River rotenone project in 1962 near Little Hole, Utah.  Courtesy of Jerry Smith, University of Michigan Museum of Zoology. Citizens like those pictured here were invited to gather the fish that had been killed by the rotenone in the Green River. Agency officials assured them the fish were safe to eat.  Photo by Rex Gary Schmidt. Courtesy of National Conservation Training Center. #4488 Citizens were invited to collect rotenoned fish and bring them home for dinner. Courtesy of Jerry Smith, University of Michigan Museum of Zoology Poisoned fish near Big Sandy, Wyoming.  Courtesy of Jerry Smith, University of Michigan Museum of Zoology.

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