Interviews & Talks

Radio & Podcasts

February 12, 2010

length: 19:16

A formidable opponent for fishermen and an easy-to-raise source of food, the dominion of the Rainbow Trout has spread to every continent except Antarctica, explains Anders Halverson, author of An Entirely Synthetic Fish.


March 2, 2010

length: 51:34

The ecology of our rivers, streams, and lakes. An Environmental Outlook on the unintended consequences of stocking the nation's inland waters with hatchery-bred fish and a look at the invasive species threatening the Great Lakes.


May 18, 2012

length: 11:17

Rivers full of rainbows

In the US, a hundred million rainbow trout are released into lakes and rivers every year. And the Sierra Nevada region in California is no exception.

According to Anders Halverson, author of An Entirely Synthetic Fish - a book all about the rainbow trout - it’s the perfect place to fish. But what was once seen as progress and a joy for anglers also comes with an environmental cost.

Many now are on a mission to reduce the numbers of the rainbow trout and restore the destroyed ecosystems. Anders spills the beans on the gift that went awry.


June 15, 2011

length: 80:50

Anders Halverson has done an exhaustive study of the origin of the rainbow trout, it's history and how it has been stocked throughout the world. Listen in to learn about this fish we love so dearly.


October 15, 2012

length: 31:52

From the Itinerant Angler: "Dr. Anders Halverson is the author of the new book, "An Entirely Synthetic Fish," which is a killer read about the rise and mass promulgation of the rainbow trout worldwide. How did a fish we put so much value on come to be so widespread, and does it really deserve the credit we give it?"


August 14, 2011

length: 10:48

Trout Unlimited's President and CEO, Chris Wood, interviews Anders Halverson about his book, "An Entirely Synthetic Fish - How Rainbow Trout Beguiled America and Overran the World." Anders talks to Chris about fish stocking and what it means for the future of America's rich sporting history.


March 29, 2010

length: 1:02:12

Anders Halverson joins us on today’s Fish Schtick. He’s the author of “An Entirely Synthetic Fish: How Rainbow Trout Beguiled America and Overran the World.” Anders is an award-winning journalist with a Ph.D. in ecology from Yale University. With support from the National Science Foundation, he wrote this book as a research associate at the University of Colorado’s Center of the American West. We’ll pick on the Rainbow Trout on today’s Fish Schtick


October 29, 2011

length: 28:31

The rainbow trout's one of the world's most popular recreational fish. Anders Halverson is the author of 'An Entirely Synthetic Fish: How Rainbow Trout Beguiled America and Overran the World'.


February 22, 2010

length: 13:37

Anders Halverson’s new book about the history of the rainbow trout in America – “An Entirely Synthetic Fish: How Rainbow Trout Beguiled America and Overran the World” - has won a National Outdoor Book award. Halverson was in Montana recently to talk about the book. In this feature interview, the aquatic ecologist talks with News Director Sally Mauk about how he became interested in the story of the rainbow…


October 9, 2011

length: 4:18

Interview with Tom Wilmer at the Outdoor Writers Association of California meeting in Redding, CA.


November 18, 2010

length: 32:45

Anders Halverson is the author of the book "An Entirely Synthetic Fish" How Rainbow Trout Beguiled America and Overran the World. During this weeks podcast were learn that the book is not really about the Rainbow Trout, it is about us. The book tells a great story of how the Rainbow has helped, hurt, changed our life as fisherman and people. Weather you agree with the author or not, this book is an amazing read for any fisherman.


February 25, 2010

length: 53:20

Anders Halverson, Ph.D., Ecologist and Award-Winning Journalist discusses An Entirely Synthetic Fish: How Rainbow Trout Beguiled America and Overran the World


Print

October 7, 2011

Written interview

Anders Halverson is the author of An Entirely Synthetic Fish — a National Outdoor Book Award Winner and a riveting book about the spread of rainbow trout across the country, often at the expense of native species.

On a recent book tour, Halverson spoke to several groups of CalTrout members, and graciously gave up some of his time for this interesting, wide-ranging interview for CalTrout’s The Streamkeeper’s Log.


Livingston Stone stands at the back of this small boat, guiding a fishing expedition for rainbow trout. The back of the photo reads "Trout expedition by Livingston Stone + Willard [or M~] Perrin." The photo was probably taken some time on the McCloud some time between 1879 and 1888. It is hard to say what method they were using to catch the fish--nets, rods, and traps were all employed by Stone and his crew.  Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone.
Boxing was as good a way to pass the time as any on the McCloud. Nothing was written on the back of this photo. It appears to have been taken at the main U.S. Fish Commission. Livingston Stone is visible sitting down in the background and the boxer on the left appears to be Loren Greene, one of Stone's first assistants.The photo is courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone.
Livingston Stone and his assistants had this portrait taken in San Francisco in 1873. Willard Perrin was Stone's nephew. There is some confusion about the identity of the man on the right. Although the front of the photo says it is Loren Greene, the back suggests it may have actually been Loren's brother Myron. The latter seems more likely as other records from the time state that it was Myron who went on the 1873 expedition.  Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, Stone's granddaughter.
An Attack. The men on the left appear to be Wintu Indians, and the men on the right to be from the U.S. Fish Commission. The subjects would have had to have stood very still for a long time to have produced such a clear picture; the photograph was clearly staged for the benefit of the photographer. However, similar confrontations were a very real phenomenon, especially in the early years of the U.S. Fish Commission's presence on the McCloud. Stone and his crew were threatened several times and other would-b
The crew of the U.S. Fish Commission builds a bridge across the McCloud with the help of a Wintu Indian (right).  Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone.
Stone and his crew seem to have enjoyed setting up scenes like this for the photographer. My guess is that they had built a more substantial headquarters building alongside the McCloud by the time this picture was made, but wanted to show the people back home what the early days had been like. To my eye it looks like Myron Greene on the left, Willard Perrin in the middle, and perhaps Stone on the right.  Photo courtesy of Beck McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone.
This drawing of a dam and water wheel was likely sketched by Stone or one of the other U.S. Fish Commission crewmembers on the McCloud. It looks like it might represent the dam and wheel in this photo.  Courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone.
There are no notes on this picture to indicate it's date or location. The dam and water wheel were probably built on the McCloud by the U.S. Fish Commission to catch fish or supply water to the hatchery and rearing ponds.  Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, Livingston Stone's granddaughter.
This portrait of Livingston Stone was taken some time after 1873 in San Francisco.  Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone
This portrait of Livingston Stone appears to have been taken before he grew his dundrearies and travelled to California.  Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone
This portrait of Livingston Stone, his wife Rebecca, and son Ned was taken by Thomas Houseworth, a famous San Francisco photographer. Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone
A picture of some Wintu Indians, the original inhabitants of the McCloud River area. Date unknown.  Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone
A portrait of the U.S. Fish Commission crew on the McCloud. Livingston Stone is in the back, second from left. Date and photographer unknown.  Photo courtesy of Becky McCue, granddaughter of Livingston Stone
Horsemen cross the McCloud River near the salmon station, probably around 1882.  National Archives 22-FFB-328
A portrait of some Wintu Indians on the McCloud River in 1882.  National Archives FFB-486
A group of Wintu taken about 1882.  National Archives 22-FFB-527
A portrait of a Wintu Indian
The trout breeding station on the McCloud
Two men sitting on a rock by the McCloud River
A view of the McCloud as it probably appeared when Stone and his crew first arrived.  National Archives 22-FFB-518
The site on the McCloud where Stone and his crew spawned salmon and trout for so many years is now hundreds of feet beneath Lake Shasta, at approximately the site where this photo was taken.  Photo by Anders Halverson
Inside one of the U.S. Fish Commission's fish cars--specially designed railroad cars in which fish and their attendants could travel around the country.  National Archives FFB-384
The U.S. Fish Commission freely delivered fish to government as well as private groups and individuals. The Commission would send a telegraph a few days before they arrived, and the recipients would wait at the train station to pick up the fish and stock them into local rivers or ponds.  National Archives 22-FFB-1000
The Interior of the U.S. Fish Commission's Central Station in Washington D.C. The jars in the background are hatching jars for eggs. Fish and eggs from all over the world were collected and distributed from this room.  National Archives 22-ffb-491
For several years, the U.S. Fish Commission raised fish in ponds on what is now the National Mall in Washington D.C. In this photo, fish arrive in milk containers on a horse-drawn cart. Note the unfinished Washington Monument in the background.  National Archives 22-FFB-539
The U.S. Fish Commission raised fish for several years in ponds on what is now the National Mall in Washington D.C.  National Archives
Stocking fish in an unnamed stream. National Archives
Spawning Rainbow trout at a U.S. Fish Commission facility in Iowa.  National Archives.
Fish were delivered all over the country on special fish delivery train cars like this. National Archives 22-FFB-1001
Spencer Fullerton Baird was the leader of the U.S. Fish Commission in its first years.  Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 95, Box 2, Folder 7
Robert Roosevelt is more commonly known today as the uncle of Teddy. However, he was a powerful and well-known man in his own right in the last decades of the 19th century. He was a strong believer in the acclimatization movement and, during his one term in Congress, introduced the bill that ultimately led to the creation of the U.S. Fish Commission.  Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division LC-BH83- 2593
Seth Green was known as the father of fish culture in America.
In his 1857 report to the Vermont legislature, George Perkins Marsh declared that "the people of New England are suffering, both physically and morally, from a too close and absorbing attention to pecuniary interests, and occupations of mere routine. We have notoriously less physical hardihood and endurance than the generation which preceded our own, our habits are those of less bodily activity; the sports of the field, and the athletic games with which the village green formerly rung upon every military an
Fish culture has changed very little from the 19th century. First squeeze the eggs out of the ripe female by firmly sliding your fingers down the belly, then squeeze the milt out of the male. Swirl it around, and you're done. Provide them a safe place to develop and you'll have some nice fish in a year. This is John Riger at the Colorado Division of Wildlife's Crystal River Hatchery.  Photo by Anders Halverson
A closeup of Colorado Division of Wildlife's John Riger spawning rainbow trout.  Photo by Anders Halverson
A closeup of Colorado Division of Wildlife's John Riger spawning rainbow trout. Photo by Anders Halverson
Raceways at Colorado's Crystal River Hatchery.  Photo by Anders Halverson
Anders Halverson tries his hand, spawning rainbow trout at Colorado's Crystal River facility.
After they hatch, fish are raised in a rearing facility like this one. Here the manager of Colorado's Chalk Cliffs Rearing Unit, Chris Hertrich, examines some young fish, some of which I helped to spawn. They reside in a retrofitted castoff trailer from the Department of Corrections.  Photo by Anders Halverson
Here they are, the fish that I helped to spawn, a few months later at the Chalk Cliffs Rearing Unit.  Photo by Anders Halverson
Because they need abundant clear water, fish culture facilities tend to be located in beautiful places. This retrofitted trailer is part of Colorado's Chalk Cliffs Rearing Unit, in Nathrop, Colorado.  Photo by Anders Halverson
The California Department of Fish and Game pioneered aerial fish planting in the years following World War II. In this photo, taken about 1950 in Bishop, CA, Dave Ward, Lee Talbot, Carrol Faist, and Jim McGregor prepare to load an WWII-surplus Beechcraft C-45 with fingerlings.
After years of stocking the lakes of the Sierra Nevada using pack animals, the California Department of Fish and Game began using airplanes in the 1940s. Many of the lakes previously had no fish.
A diagram of a typical aerial fish planting run, drawn by one of the pioneers: Carrol Faist.
A group at the University of Missouri is studying the effects of creatine--the same supplement used by athletes like home-run slugger Mark McGwire--on rainbow trout. Here the fish swims in a Plexiglas tube to measure its endurance. "Sportsmen would likely pay a premium for a fishing experience where the fish struck the bait harder and fought longer," said one of the researchers in a press release.  Photo by Steve Morse
Adam Konrad caught world-record, 43-pound rainbow trout in a Saskatchewan lake. His prize probably escaped from a nearby aquaculture facility and had been manipulated to contain an extra set of chromosomes—a feature that makes such fish grow much faster and larger than normal.  Photo courtesy of Otto and Adam Konrad
Loading a plane with fish for stocking in Lake Powell.  Photo by Rex Gary Schmidt. Courtesy of National Conservation Training Center. #4572
Stocking rainbow trout in Lake Powell  Photo by Rex Gary Schmidt. Courtesy of National Conservation Training Center. #5066
Putting fingerling trout in a plane for stocking in Lake Powell  Photo by Rex Gary Schmidt. Courtesy of National Conservation Training Center. #4577
Rainbow trout in nutritional chamber.  Photo by Nicholas Mariana. Courtesy of National Conservation Training Center #5297
Sometimes you have to ask what this enterprise is all about.  Photo by Anders Halverson
In the decades that followed World War II, reservoirs were built all over the country. Visiting them to fish for rainbow trout became one of America's favorite pasttimes. This picture was taken in 1972.  National Archives ARC Identifier 542647 / Local Identifier 412-DA-154

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